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You are here: Metaphysical

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Gemstone Lore

The love of precious stones is deeply implanted in the human heart, and the cause of this must be sought not only in their coloring and brilliancy but also in their durability. The colours of flowers and foliage, the blue of the sky, and the beauty of the sunset clouds only last for a short time, and are subject to continual change, but the sheen and coloration of precious stones are the same today as they were thousands of years ago and will be for thousands of years to come. In a world of change, this permanence has a charm of its own.


Precious stones have been used across history and among many different peoples to explain some of the curious ideas and fancies that have gathered around them. Many of these ideas may seem strange enough to us now, and yet when we analyze them we find that they have their roots either in some intrinsic quality of the stones or else in an instinctive appreciation of their symbolical significance. This symbolism, through it's manifold transformations, has persisted to the present day and is currently enjoying a revival.


The same thing may be said in regard to the various superstitions connected with gems. Our scientific knowledge of cause and effect may prevent us from accepting any of the fanciful notions of the physicians and astrologers of history; nevertheless, the possession of a necklace or a ring adorned with brilliant diamonds, pearls, warm, glowing rubies, or celestial-hued sapphires will today make a woman's heart beat faster and bring a blush of pleasure to her cheek. Life will seem better worth living to her; and, indeed, this is no delusion, for life is what our thought makes it.  Hence nothing that contributes to increasing the sum of innocent pleasures should be disdained; and surely no pleasure can be more innocent and justifiable than that inspired by the possession of beautiful natural objects.

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